Tuesday, April 26, 2016

76 Trombones in the Big Parade

LI - Pic of WPC and TOR T-76 (Trombones)Will you be there?

Will you make it to the Big Show?

Will you make it to The Big Parade?

The Big Parade starts in 76 days.
WPC 16 is almost here. 

T-76 

We are at 76 Days before the worlds largest Partner to Partner Conference. Make sure you are prepared to do at least the following four things:

  1. Register - Start Here!
  2. Begin your Pre-Event Planning
  3. Build out your message and elevator pitch
  4. Follow Up! This is the #1 thing you can do to differentiate yourself.

15,000+

There are expected to be more than 15,000 partners at the WPC 16. Some you may already be partnering with. Others you SHOULD be partnering with. Make it EASY for them to identify you and you them.

P2P

Also, Microsoft has published some of the key elements of the WPC event. 

Dont Miss .... The Road to WPC

As noted here before ... there is a road trip in the works with Kevin McMillen from Ryantech. Follow along and get involved here. Let us know if you are on the route. If you are there may be a special surprise for you. Details are here on this post 

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You can follow along here: http://www.theroadtowpc16.com/
Subscribe to the updates to stay abreast of the plans.

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Will You Be There for the Big Parade?

I hope so.

If yes …

Meet me in Toronto for the largest
Partner-to-Partner Conference in the world.
 

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You may also want to check these out for more details - both have a short video:

Image Credits: Microsoft, Ryantech

clip_image001Jeff is an expert in the Enterprise Content Management industry. He brings over 20 years of Channel Sales, Partner Marketing and Alliance expertise to audiences around the world in speaking engagements and via his writing. He has worked for Microsoft, Kodak, and K2. He is currently the consulting with Microsoft and partners to drive Community Engagement and Alliances.

Tweet him
@jshuey or connect on LinkedIn, Facebook, or Google+ He is active in the Microsoft Partner Community and is the co-founder and President of the IAMCP Seattle chapter. He is also active with the Women in Technology and STEMWIT efforts.

He is a contributing author to
Entrepreneur, Elite Daily, Yahoo, US News and to the Personal Branding Blog

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Saturday, April 16, 2016

Is 150 years too much time?

This month two businesses turned 150 years old and one innovator would have turned 153.

  • Did they do it with one product?
  • Did they do it with one specific feature?
  • Did they do it with one call to action?

One of them did it with effectively the same product for the entire time. The other two continued to modify, adapt (more on that in a minute ), and to really think about what customers wanted. And, the third did it with pure style and attention to detail.

imageAll of them did it with ONE THING.

That one thing morphed over time.

That one thing took work to understand and appreciate.

That one thing took time to appreciate and ingratiate itself into the consumer psyche.

Is 150 years enough to consider yourself a viable long-term company?

I think the obvious answer is yes.

Can you imagine your business surviving to be 150 years old?

In the technology space where I spend the majority of my time IBM has broken the hundred year mark and Microsoft just passed the 40 year mark. Many others in tech space are nowhere near 20, let alone 50 or 150.

Can you imagine Facebook at 150?

How about Snapchat or Twitter?

Is Built to Last still a thing?

Jim Collins wrote the seminal book "Built to Last" a few years ago. No, not 150 years ago. In it he described businesses that were, surprise ... Built to Last" and shared examples of their long term study. This is not a diatribe on Built to Last.

Rather it's a reflection of three companies that have found the One Thing that allowed then to persevere and succeed. Two of them for 150 years and one for 110 years. My suspicion is that these companies will continue to plug along. General Mills did almost $18 billion in revenue last year. However, I wonder if some of the "upstart" companies that are doing well today can make it to 50 years. Or even if they want to.

The three companies I'm looking at today came from a few segments on the CBS Sunday show and one was from a commercial I happen to see.

  • imageGeneral Mills - From flour to organic mac-n-cheese. And, the invention of the Nerf products too. The Big G is a great example of a company that has found growth in commodity products by continuous innovation and adaptation. They never seem to rest of their laurels.

    This video from CBS Sunday about their 150 Years in business explains where they started, how they've grown and where they are going.

    Ken Powell, chairman and CEO of General Mills, said it best:

    "By adapting" That is how the company has survived this long.
  • 20160415_015703373_iOSJack Daniels - The venerable maker of whiskey has made effectively the same product for 150 years.

    Over time, and especially in the past few years, there has been more adaptation and innovation to attract, capture and secure new markets. Both in the US and in overseas markets where the brand practically sells itself.
  • imageRolls-Royce - Not quite 150 years for the company, but 153 years ago motorcar legend Henry Royce was born near Peterborough, England.

    He developed THE STANDARD for automotive luxury. Their brand and their reputation for building automobiles with impeccable attention to detail remains the gold standard ... even 110 years after the famous brand built their first automobile. Here is an interesting Almanac view from CBS Sunday

Full Disclosure: I saw these two video clips on the same day a few weeks ago and have been noodling around this idea for the desire of any company to make it to 150 years.

I'm not convinced any of the relatively young companies of today can make it. Or even want to make it to 150 years.

While I was noodling this idea I saw a commercial that showed Jack Daniel's is also 150 years old. Which caught my eye and intrigued me.

Is 150 Years Too Long?

I used each of the companies above as an example. Which leads to a few questions about longevity and whether there is a market force that would prevent a company today from making it to the advanced age of 50, 100 or 150 years.

  • Can today's "modern" companies survive to be 50, 100, or even older than 150 year old enterprises?
  • Do the economics work against them?
  • Do market forces reward longevity?

Time will tell ... literally.

The One Thing

Adapt

The CEO of General Mills said it very eloquently and aptly. He said the way they have survived and grown for so long is by constantly seeking to adapt.

Which leads me to a few questions for you to consider. As I mentioned above I'm not sure any of the current spate of companies that are doing quite well today have any desire or intention ... let alone a plan ... to grow to be ever 50 years old. Let alone 100 or 150 years old.

What do you think?

  • How will your company adapt for the future?
    • Whether you own the company or "just" work there.
  • How will the companies that you trust and respect (and maybe even love) today adapt for the future?

Discuss. Drop your thoughts here in the comments. Or reach out to me via social networking or email.

Image Credits: CBS Sunday

clip_image001Jeff is an expert in the Enterprise Content Management industry. He brings over 20 years of Channel Sales, Partner Marketing and Alliance expertise to audiences around the world in speaking engagements and via his writing. He has worked for Microsoft, Kodak, and K2. He is currently the consulting with Microsoft and partners to drive Community Engagement and Alliances.

Tweet him
@jshuey or connect on LinkedIn, Facebook, or Google+ He is active in the Microsoft Partner Community and is the co-founder and President of the IAMCP Seattle chapter. He is also active with the Women in Technology and STEMWIT efforts.

He is a contributing author to
Entrepreneur, Elite Daily, Yahoo, US News and to the Personal Branding Blog

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Thursday, April 14, 2016

88 Keys and 88 Days --- The Countdown to WPC

image88 Keys on a Piano and 88 Days to the Microsoft Worldwide Partner Conference.

Coincidence? I think not.

The WPC is Almost Here

I have 6 things to cover in todays Notes from the Trails video. The points are also covered in the text below. There are links to each point and I’m always open to hearing from you. Please feel free to reach out directly or to comment here.

20160414_025159000_iOS from Jeff Shuey on Vimeo.

1 and 2 are closely aligned – Keeping up with the Microsoft Leaders

Make sure you are following along with Microsoft’s Channel Chief Phil Sorgen. He is posting great information about what partners can do and expect at the WPC. He also posts information about other aspects of the Microsoft business – including partner activities, IAMCP efforts and some of the products and technologies that Microsoft is developing.

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Also, follow along with Gavriella Schuster, Microsoft’s GM of the WW Partner Group. She is posting information about how partners can get the most from Microsoft. She has a great team and she stays engaged in the partner community. She also shares information about how to connect across generations, how to optimize your sales and marketing teams, and how to work with with multiple technologies and multiple partners. She has also been a great advocate for IAMCP and WIT motions.

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3 and 4 are also closely aligned – Keeping up with Partner Leaders

  • IAMCP – Get involved. Connect, Learn and Grow your business. With 80 chapters around the world you should connect with your local International Association of Microsoft Channel Partners (IAMCP) Chapter. Get Started here.
  • imageWIT – Most of the IAMCP chapters are also aligned with a local Women in Technology (WIT). Together we are working hard to encourage women of all ages to get involved with technology – which often spans STEM and STEAM efforts.

5 is very Seattle specific – Visit the IAMCP Seattle Chapter

  • imageApril 21 – Our first meeting at the new Microsoft PacWest Sales Office at Lincoln Square. Details are here. Join us!
  • May 18 – Cloud Readiness Bootcamp
  • May 19 – P2P Workshop
  • Seattle IAMCP WIT Chapter Info – Sign up for the newsletter here.

6 is all about the FunBus --- a portmanteau of Fun and Business.

imageKevin McMillen, Founder of Ryantech is making the cross-county FunBus trip from Phoenix to Toronto in a motorhome.

The map of the trip is here and you can sign up to be updated here.

imageRumor has it that there might be an upright piano in the motorhome. Where Ryan and others can regale partners and friends along the way with their skills at tickling the ivory.

You’ll have to folllow along with the FunBus ride by adding your name to the list here.

 

See you in 88 Days!

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If you haven’t registered for The WPC yet …. Click on the image below to go to the registration site and take advantage of the discounts.See you in Toronto.

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Image Credits: Microsoft, Ryantech

clip_image001Jeff is an expert in the Enterprise Content Management industry. He brings over 20 years of Channel Sales, Partner Marketing and Alliance expertise to audiences around the world in speaking engagements and via his writing. He has worked for Microsoft, Kodak, and K2. He is currently the consulting with Microsoft and partners to drive Community Engagement and Alliances.

Tweet him
@jshuey or connect on LinkedIn, Facebook, or Google+ He is active in the Microsoft Partner Community and is the co-founder and President of the IAMCP Seattle chapter. He is also active with the Women in Technology and STEMWIT efforts.

He is a contributing author to
Entrepreneur, Elite Daily, Yahoo, US News and to the Personal Branding Blog

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Friday, April 8, 2016

6 Weeks In and the Smiles keep Growing

20160404_013953000_iOSIt's been a little over a month with the iPhone ... after many years on Windows devices.

So far ... so good. There are a few goofy idiosyncrasies that are partially me and partially the OS.

I’m getting used to it and still learning tips and tricks from YOU … the experts. Thanks to everyone out there that have shared apps, ideas and best practices.

I’m thinking of people like Bryan Hart, Owen Allen and Chakkaradeep Chandran and a few others. THANK YOU! Keep ‘em coming!

As a friend in the Microsoft partner ecosystem told me …

“It’s like going from radio to color television”
~ Jon Sastre

imageThese are a few of My Favorite Things:
(Yes, you can sing along to the Sound of Music)

If you have more … share ‘em in the comments.

  1. Outlook for iOS is AWESOME! The Focused View is amazing.
  2. ApplePay -- I've used it 3 times and I smile every time.
  3. Apps ... duh! Having modern (and updated apps is AMAZING)
  4. Thumbprint Unlock - Kinda cool.
  5. Podcasts that you can listen too while doing other stuff.
  6. Banking Apps -- Life Savers! And, gasoline savers (and time too)!
  7. Did I say apps? Yes, a surfing app, a SBUX app, an NPR One app, a Zillow app, a Sioeye app --- they are not business critical, but they are VERY NICE to have. The Microsoft apps for iOS are impressive too.

image

Bonus:
Use Siri to check on the planes over your head RIGHT NOW!


Press the home button and say:

Wolfram, What Planes are Overhhead?

imageGo ahead and try it. I’ll wait.
Apple has an arrangement with Wolfram Alpha
You don’t need to download the app for this.

Worst / Could Use Improvement

Note: These are NOT complaints. They are just observations.

Big Plus --- And this is HUGE:
Because someone is paying attention to this device and this ecosystem I am confident that these issues will be addressed and fixed.

  1. OneNote: The inability to send myself text versions of OneNote's via email is sorely lacking. It's not a show stopper, but it is noticed.
  2. Camera: It's good, but it's no Lumia.
  3. Camera Apps: The Nokia Lumia has an amazing One Touch Fix for 99% of all pics. The iPhone magic wand is quite up to par for my expectations. 
    1. Thanks to Chakkaradeep Chandran for the notes on the camera apps Snapseed, enlight and ProCam.

Thank you to everyone for the comments,
recommendations and for the Tips & Tricks.

I’m not the only one …

imageThere are a few of us in this new world order, this world of apps and vibrant ecosystems. Including Darrell Webster, Kelvin Kirby, David Gersten (Android) and a few others that were long time Windows Phone users that have made the jump.

We are like the proverbial kid in the candy store.

If you want to read about my exploits in the Windows Phone world I have written a lot about it, but you might want to start here in Back Story … 17 Years in Transition.

Yes, I’m late to the party, but I’m really happy I have made the move.

As Jon Sastre, Founder and CEO ConQuest Technology Services said about making the same move to the iPhone:

“It’s like going from radio to color television”

What do you think?

  • What is your ONE APP you cannot live without?
  • What app do you tell EVERYONE they MUST download?
  • What are your Tips & Tricks?
  • What apps and action have you found that just make you smile?

Add your thoughts here and let’s share what we can and make the ecosystem that much more enlightened and lively.

Thanks and I look forward to seeing you in Apps-Sphere.

Image Credits: my new iPhone and thanks to Jeff Dahl for being a super model

clip_image001Jeff is an expert in the Enterprise Content Management industry. He brings over 20 years of Channel Sales, Partner Marketing and Alliance expertise to audiences around the world in speaking engagements and via his writing. He has worked for Microsoft, Kodak, and K2. He is currently the consulting with Microsoft and partners to drive Community Engagement and Alliances.

Tweet him
@jshuey or connect on LinkedIn, Facebook, or Google+ He is active in the Microsoft Partner Community and is the co-founder and President of the IAMCP Seattle chapter. He is also active with the Women in Technology and STEMWIT efforts.

He is a contributing author to
Entrepreneur, Elite Daily, Yahoo, US News and to the Personal Branding Blog

image

Friday, April 1, 2016

Secrets from Recruiters …The WIT Panel Discussion

20160331_005653501_iOS (2)This week I attended the Women in Technology – "Secrets from Recruiters" session at the Microsoft Civica offices.

A great panel of industry experts was assembled by the moderator, Dana Manciagli.

Panelists (left to right in the picture)

A big thanks and shout out to the Seattle IAMCP WIT team too - Kate Chan, Marcy Knott, Misty Fisher, Laurie Mix. They coordinate the event and made sure the very full room was able to focus their attention on the panelists.

A few more pictures from the evening are here: http://bit.ly/IAMCPWIT_March_Recruiters 

As usual I shot a video about it as a Notes from the Trails too. In it I thank the panelists for their information and for answering some tough questions from the audience. Some of them are detailed below. Also, I mention the sister organization of the WIT, which is the IAMCP. We work together to help Women and Microsoft Partner --- not exclusively --- to Connect, Learn and Grow.

Notes from the Trails - WIT Secrets from Recruiters from Jeff Shuey on Vimeo.

Takeaways

So, what did we learn?

We learned a lot. One of the points that was not a surprise was that the HR professionals are just as busy as the rest of us. They get dozens, if not hundreds, of resumes / CV’s every day and week.

Three Points to Kick Off the Panel Discussion:

  1. Boiling it Down (be concise). Everyone is Busy. There are no tricks.
  2. Sometimes it's just a timing thing.
  3. Be persistent. Apply again. Not habitually, but again. (see Red Flags)

Beware of The Third Point of the Triangle

imageTo start us off Dana asked everyone to put their hands in the shape of a triangle. Each point of the triangle represented one aspect of the human resources process.

The fact is … one of those corners IS a robot. That robot must be fed in order for your resume to get through. Be aware and realize that you need to custom tailor your resume and guidance documents to help get to and through “The Bot.”

imageDana has a great example of how to do this in her book “Cut the Crap” – it’s not a trick. It’s a fact of the current HR system. If you don’t like it … find another way in. Until then … work with the system to maximize the likelihood of your resume and your CTC Candidate Pack get through.

Highlights of Great Interviewees:

  • Research - Know the company, know the business, know the job you are applying for
  • Have Answers for These two Questions:
    1. Why do you want to work at this company?
    2. Why do you want this job?
  • Stay on Point - Rambling doesn't help your cause. Get to the point and stop.
  • Great Examples - The best are concise interviewees with really good examples of what they've done and what they what.
  • Law of Threes - Keep it simple and succinct (3 bullet points)

Pro Tip #1 - Being concise comes across as more confident

Pro Tip #2 - Ask this - especially if you think you might be going off the rails. Ask - Am I answering your question?

For College Grads (or soon to be grads):

  • Internships – Of course, these need to happen before you apply. So, plan accordingly. If you want to get hired go to the Campus Recruiting Day.
  • Associations – Get involved with campus activities. Student government, clubs related to your major, groups connected to your passions.
  • Recommendations – Yes, ask your parents, your parents friends, your professors and anyone else you think might be able to help you make a connection

Pro Tip for College recruits:
Go right to the bottom and look at years of experience required.
If it’s 2-3 you are probably OK. Especially if you interned in similar roles. If it says 5+ years required … move along.

Red Flags

  • imageShort Stints - 8 months here, 1.5 years there, etc. There might be a perfectly logical reason for this - startups, company was sold, contract gigs (see below), not the right fit, RIF's, etc. But, too often the candidate never gets a chance to explain them.
  • Contract Work - They realize that contract work IS short term work. If you worked in a contract position … state that on your resume.
  • Applying for Too Many Roles – Recruiters are looking for great candidates. They do notice when someone applies for multiple roles with the same resume and points.
  • No Dates - Resumes with no date ranges are suspect. If you did it … date it!
  • What Are Your Skills - A recruiter (or your friend reviewing your resume) must be able to look at a resume and figure out specifically what you do and might be capable of doing.

How Can YOU Get Involved?

Go to the IAMCP WIT website or or the IAMCP Seattle WIT website – sign up for the newsletter and get involved.

Did You Miss this event? No problem. The next WIT event on April 26th. The details are here “Unpacking Unconscious Bias” – click on the link for details and to sign up. Note that this event has a fee and is being held at the Microsoft Main Campus.

WIT – Women in Technology (link)

Let’s Connect

If you want to know more or connect with me to ask any questions or get involved please contact me directly. My contact details are below for social networking channels or send email to jeff@nunalu.com

For more information see IAMCP and IAMCP WIT

Also, if you haven’t registered for the WPC yet … get on it. Discounts are in place now. The Session Catalog is live as of this week … see Dean Martin’s post.

Click on the image below to go to the registration site and take advantage of the discounts. See you in Toronto.

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clip_image001Jeff is an expert in the Enterprise Content Management industry. He brings over 20 years of Channel Sales, Partner Marketing and Alliance expertise to audiences around the world in speaking engagements and via his writing. He has worked for Microsoft, Kodak, and K2. He is currently the consulting with Microsoft and partners to drive Community Engagement and Alliances.

Tweet him
@jshuey or connect on LinkedIn, Facebook, or Google+ He is active in the Microsoft Partner Community and is the co-founder and President of the IAMCP Seattle chapter. He is also active with the Women in Technology and STEMWIT efforts.

He is a contributing author to
Entrepreneur, Elite Daily, Yahoo, US News and to the Personal Branding Blog

image

Monday, March 14, 2016

Congrats to the new IAMCP US board … Full Steam Ahead

WP_20160221_21_51_16_ProIn case you missed it. Your new IAMCP US board has just been installed and they are already working for you.

Congratulations to each of them:

  • Ro Kolakowski, President
  • Randy Steinle, Vice-President
  • Tom Major, Treasurer
  • David Gersten, Secretary

In today's Notes from the Trails I am sending congratulations to the new President, Ro Kolakowski and the new VP, Randy Steinle and the new Treasurer, Tom Major and the new Secretary, David Gersten and a big THANK YOU to the Immediate Past President, Jon Sastre.

You may have seen the press release - if not, here is the link.

Here is my Notes from the Trails video …

Notes from the Trails - Congratulations to the new IAMCP US Board from Jeff Shuey on Vimeo.

Ro, as the incoming president has already taken steps to kick things into gear. Including using Office 365, SharePoint and OneDrive for Business for storing, sharing and showcasing the great job partners are doing.

As for me, I am transitioning my role of MarCom to Jon Rivers. Fresh thinking and fresh ideas are always a good thing. Jon has a lot of organizational energy and a lot of expertise in social engagement and partnering.

I look forward to seeing how Ro, Jon and the rest of the board shift the IAMCP to the Cloud and Beyond.

These are exciting times for partners. There are a lot of options to choose from. The IAMCP is a place where partners can connect with other partners, can share best practices and can find out about deals they might not otherwise be aware. (see my post on Partnering with IAMCP). The IAMCP is focused on insuring partners Connect, Learn and Grow.

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The IAMCP is also very actively involved in community engagement efforts and with the Microsoft Worldwide Partner Conference. A few of the most active areas are listed below. If you are involved with them already … fantastic. If not, please think about joining the IAMCP and getting involved.

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The Past Sets the Pace for the Future

A Big Thank You to Jon Sastre. He is the Immediate Past President of the IAMCP US. His efforts to help define how chapters grow, interact and accelerate are to be commended.

WP_20160221_16_47_45_Pro
Incoming IAMCP US President Ro Kolakowski thanking Immediate Past President Jon Sastre with some memorable pictures of his tenure.

Resources:

Image Credits: Ro Kolakowski

clip_image001Jeff is an expert in the Enterprise Content Management industry. He brings over 20 years of Channel Sales, Partner Marketing and Alliance expertise to audiences around the world in speaking engagements and via his writing. He has worked for Microsoft, Kodak, and K2. He is currently the consulting with Microsoft and partners to drive Community Engagement and Alliances.

Tweet him
@jshuey or connect on LinkedIn, Facebook, or Google+ He is active in the Microsoft Partner Community and is the co-founder and President of the IAMCP Seattle chapter.

He is a contributing author to
Entrepreneur, Elite Daily, Yahoo, US News and to the Personal Branding Blog

image

Saturday, February 27, 2016

My First iPhone … and a few more Firsts

imageAfter a long run on Windows Powered mobile devices I have made the switch.

I went with T-Mobile and an iPhone 6 Plus.

See my Back Story post if you are interested in the details of the transition.

My First Text, err iMessage

Within the first few minutes of owning the phone my wife texted me to say welcome to the App Side of the world. And, she also softly prodded me to remember my challenges with my Windows Phones over the years. For those that have been following along with the journey you know EXACTLY what she means.

It started off AWESOME!

Within the first few hours I also had:

  • imageMy first voice mail – Thanks to my longtime windsurfing friend Joe Simmons for that call. Sorry, I couldn’t pick up. I was finalizing the payment on the new phone. Yes, I did call him back. He made the switch to Apple many years ago.
  • My first phone call – from my fellow Microsoft Alum, Molly Von Mitschke Collande of the Microsoft Alumni Network. Surprise … we talked about partnering at the Microsoft Worldwide Partner Conference, aka The WPC.
  • My first FaceTime – from SharePoint User Group leader and long time Microsoft friend, Owen Allen. He FaceTime’d me (If that’s the right verb) to see how the transition was going and to offer his time to go thru his apps to see how he’s using his iPhone.

I asked for and received a lot of feedback. I want to thank everyone for their insights. I also played with and tested a few different options – form factors, manufacturers, and carriers.

Ultimately … I went with T-Mobile and an iPhone 6 Plus.

The Why is Simple

Everyone in my family already had iPhones. Some might say … “So what? … that’s no reason to go with Apple” (and several said just that). However, it was easy to make the move so that we call can iMessage now, we call can FaceTime, and because T-Mobile has an unlimited plan we all can share and consume to our hearts content.

Bonus Points:
T-Mobile treats Canada and Mexico as equals and does NOT charge their customers for using their services across North America.

My trip to the #WPC16 in Toronto this July will be MUCH easier now.

Side Notes and a Caveat:

Business is easy … when you make it easy to do business with you.

  • AT&T had the first right of refusal for my business. They chose NOT to make it easy to switch devices. As a result they lost me and my whole family as a customer. I doubt they’ll notice or care, but it’s an interesting data point in customer retention.
  • Thanks to my longtime Microsoft friend and colleague Donna Conner for introducing me to Dave, Jon and Jessica at the T-Mobile store in Issaquah. They were professional and easy to work with in making the switch.
  • Apple still knows how to create “delightful” product packaging. Just taking the iPhone out of the box is a smile inducing experience.

Back Story

Starting in 1999 when I joined Microsoft I had a T-Mobile Dash. It was a great device. Times have changed. The model has changed. Read the rest here …

A Few Firsts

I’ve had a few more firsts since opening up the box yesterday. Some are pretty obvious. Some caught me by surprise. Watch this space. I’ll share more as I learn more.

Thanks again to everyone for their advice and guidance before buying. I heard you and I heeded your suggestions. Especially those that advocated Android. I may still try Android in the not too distant future, but for now I’m happy by starting my journey to the App Side of Life with an iPhone 6 Plus.

Image Credit: My lovely bride (on her new iPhone 6)

clip_image001Jeff is an expert in the Enterprise Content Management industry. He brings over 20 years of Channel Sales, Partner Marketing and Alliance expertise to audiences around the world in speaking engagements and via his writing. He has worked for Microsoft, Kodak, and K2. He is currently the consulting with Microsoft and partners to drive Community Engagement and Alliances.

Tweet him
@jshuey or connect on LinkedIn, Facebook, or Google+ He is active in the Microsoft Partner Community and is the co-founder and President of the IAMCP Seattle chapter.

He is a contributing author to
Entrepreneur, Elite Daily, Yahoo, US News and to the Personal Branding Blog

image