Sunday, May 22, 2016

50 Tips to Maximize your WPC Experience

Here we are at T-50

There are 50 Days until the Microsoft Worldwide Partner Conference begins.

Also known as The WPC.

Starting today and counting down every day until the WPC begins you will see a Tip a Day. The plan is to have a running list of all the tips so you can see them all as the T-Zero Day gets closer.

The goal is the help you … the attendee, the partner, the sponsor, the person to …

Maximize your WPC Experience

Here is the first tip … yes, they will count down. Here is the link to the first tip.

image

You can follow along with all the tips. You will see posts on social networks too.

All of the Links are LIVE!

The template image you see above has live links for a lot of information about the WPC. I am using the Microsoft Doc.com site to store the images. I created a collection on Docs.com and will see how it goes. I may change this as we move thru the 50 Days of Tips. Think SWAY!

There are links about the IAMCP – including information about:

  • imageJoining the IAMCP
  • The Annual Charity Golf Event -
    Play, Sponsor or Both!
  • Follow the IAMCP on the social networks

50 Tips and Your Tips

What are your best tips? I created a survey where you can post your own tips. The best tips will win prizes. They will not be huge, but I have a few things in mind that will thank you for your contribution.

imageWPC Info – there is a link on the top right (and to the right here) where you an click to Register for the event.

Of course, you can click through that link to see more about the event. Including posts from the Microsoft leaders and a few partners. Start here … Why WPC?

The Road to WPC – Don’t forget to follow along with Kevin McMillen of Ryantech. Follow along and get involved here. Read more in my 76 Trombones in the Big Parade.

Let’s have some fun with these tips. This is my 15th WPC and I’ve been going to trade shows for many years. My tips may seem like common sense, but they are often overlooked and forgotten.

See you in Toronto!

I look forward to you sharing your best tips for WPC (or any trade show) and to meeting you in person in Toronto.

Even if you aren’t going to make it to Toronto this year please feel free to leave your comments and add your tips. Also, never hesitate to contact me if you have any questions or if you think I can help you with your partnering, alliance or community engagement efforts. My contact information is below … of you can always send email to me at Jeff.Shuey@iamcp.org

Image Credits: Microsoft, RyanTech

clip_image001Jeff is an expert in the Enterprise Content Management industry. He brings over 20 years of Channel Sales, Partner Marketing and Alliance expertise to audiences around the world in speaking engagements and via his writing. He has worked for Microsoft, Kodak, and K2. He is currently the consulting with Microsoft and partners to drive Community Engagement and Alliances.

Tweet him
@jshuey or connect on LinkedIn, Facebook, or Google+ He is active in the Microsoft Partner Community and is the co-founder and President of the IAMCP Seattle chapter. He is also active with the Women in Technology and STEMWIT efforts.

He is a contributing author to
Entrepreneur, Elite Daily, Yahoo, US News and to the Personal Branding Blog

image

Saturday, May 21, 2016

3 Things Microsoft needs for a Surface Phone launch

Here are what I consider to be The Three Things Microsoft needs to do for a successful Surface Phone Launch

LI - Microsoft Surface Phone (700x400) - Is this the one---

Microsoft Phones!

An Oxymoron to Rule Them All!

This has been an oxymoron for a few years.

Can the Surface Phone
reverse that perception?

Time will tell. However, unless Microsoft does at least (Microsoft speak) these three things the chances for success will be significantly reduced.

Think Apps, Pics and Price!

How did we get here?

imageMicrosoft has written off $7.6B (that's Billion with a B) dollars on their disastrous acquisition of the Nokia phone line. Which in the end seems to have been just a mechanism to make Two Steve's Rich (Steve Ballmer and Steve (Stephen) Elop). More power to 'em! 

Was that effort doomed to fail?

I don't know. At this point it doesn't matter. 

After the announcement this week that Foxconn is buying what's left of the Nokia feature phone line for $350M (that's with an M --- not a B).

This seems to primarily be the production facility where the low-end phones were manufactured. This is not much of a loss for Microsoft. Even though I do think that is going to be a hot market for the "other 4 billion" people that don't have mobiles phones today.

What does Microsoft need to do?

In order to break into the mobile phone market ... which is dominated by Android today in sheer numbers of units with 82% market share; followed by Apple with 14% share; and Microsoft being sub-2% and Blackberry (RIM) in similarly dire straights.

Microsoft needs to Tilt the Tables

I suspect this is going to be the time where Microsoft does it's classic move and Tilt the Tables.

Who remembers Bill Gate's Internet Tidal Wave memo?
I wrote about that here in regards to Riding the Windows 10 Wave.

Satya Nadella, Microsoft's new'ish CEO is 2 years in the role ... he has enough chits to keep this machine rolling and also to make a few satellite shots or one big moon shot.

I suspect this is a satellite shot
with moon shot implications

Why? Because of his mantra of Mobile First -  Cloud First

imageIf you are going to claim Mobile First ...

you better have a plan for

Mobile from Microsoft.

 

What Does Microsoft Need to do?

In order to win in mobile Microsoft has a ways to go. But, they don't have much of a choice. They need to play in this space. To date that market has been wisely and deftly navigated with key acquisitions and also by building apps for the "other" devices. In case you don't know ... there are fantastic (and FREE) apps for the Android and iOS devices.

The Three Core Things

These are simple, obvious, and shouldn't surprise anyone. They are:

  1. Apps Matter! A viable app store is needed. This will take time.
  2. Pics Matter! A rock solid camera. The Nokia cameras and software continue to outpace what Apple and Android devices have produced.
  3. Price Matters! - It has to be cheap or at least perceived as reasonably priced. While Microsoft needs to keep their eye on profitability they are not going to get people to switch unless the price is right.

Don't Get Me Wrong!

I'm a fan of Microsoft and of the Microsoft Windows Phone. After 17 years on various forms of the Windows Phone platform I just switched to an iPhone about 3 months ago. As I wrote about here in My First iPhone … and a few more Firsts and here in 6 Weeks In and the Smiles keep Growing. If you want to read the back story start here: Back Story … 17 Years in Transition

What do you think?

  • Does Microsoft have a shot at Mobile?
  • Do they have a choice?
  • How do you see Microsoft competing in the Mobile world?
Pro Tip: Don't Count Microsoft Out.
They have tenacity, vision and most important ... CASH!

Add your comments here. Let's get a dialogue going.

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This is cross-posted to LinkedIn here.

Image Credits: Microsoft, US Navy

This post was inspired by this article - Microsoft Surface Phone release date news: Device to be released next year, Microsoft says goodbye to Lumia line 

clip_image001Jeff is an expert in the Enterprise Content Management industry. He brings over 20 years of Channel Sales, Partner Marketing and Alliance expertise to audiences around the world in speaking engagements and via his writing. He has worked for Microsoft, Kodak, and K2. He is currently the consulting with Microsoft and partners to drive Community Engagement and Alliances.

Tweet him
@jshuey or connect on LinkedIn, Facebook, or Google+ He is active in the Microsoft Partner Community and is the co-founder and President of the IAMCP Seattle chapter. He is also active with the Women in Technology and STEMWIT efforts.

He is a contributing author to
Entrepreneur, Elite Daily, Yahoo, US News and to the Personal Branding Blog

image

Tuesday, May 10, 2016

Guy Kawasaki gave me a job

imageHave you read the book "Selling the Dream"

It is the seminal book that created an industry and a job title for many people.

Including me and quite a few others.

Evangelism is the process of selling a dream (Click to tweet this)

Evangelism Matters!

Of course, the term has been around for many years. However, the term wasn’t commonly used in the technology world prior to Guy Kawasaki mentioning it in his book. Note: this may not be 100% true, but it is true for me. It took Guy Kawasaki to put the word in the context of the technology industry. Which in turn created a career path and an industry.

Truth be told … Some of my best friends are evangelists.

Why? Because they are passionate about their technology of choice, They have taken the time to understand it and to think about how best to explain it, demonstrate it, and to show it in specific solution scenarios.

  • Does it work every time?
  • Do they always convince me that their tech of choice is the best?
  • Of course, the answer is no. But, they will take the time to listen to different points of view. And, usually go right back into evangelism mode.

Evangelism is the practice of convincing people to believe in your product or idea. (Click to Tweet this)

But, what is true is the very fact that by Guy Kawasaki writing this book and getting it published it created a whole new genre and industry for a lot of technical and business professionals.

I owe my career to Guy Kawasaki

There are a lot of examples of people that I know that also have similar careers that I would argue owe their careers to Guy Kawasaki too. People like Lauren Cooney, people like Rob Barker, and people like Christian Buckley. They are each very good at what they do. They are evangelists that span what I call “The Three Pillars” of evangelism. They are Technical, Developer, and Business. More on this later.

What is an evangelist?

A recent podcast from the Microsoft Partner Network highlighted Christian Buckley. I have often thought of Christian as the penultimate blogger, speaker and evangelist. And, this podcast shows his skills and his adroitness and explaining what an evangelist is, what an evangelist does, and he even talks about metrics.

image

It has been many years since I've read "Selling the Dream" but I have often flashed back to what I learned and what I envisioned Guy Kawasaki did to get us this far.

By selling the dream, you are transforming a vision into a cause. (Click to Tweet this)

image If you haven't read it yet here's your chance.

If you want to read a condensed version start
here.

Beyond Apple’s Evangelist

Although Guy Kawasaki worked for Apple during the time he envisioned the book there are other companies that have taken the evangelism model and build great programs around it.

Microsoft was one of the early ones to get into the game too. There's one person that every Microsoft MVP should thank for this … and that is Sean O'Driscoll. He envisioned the whole idea of a community almost 20 years ago.

Image result for microsoft mvpSean envision the idea of helping partners become evangelists via the Microsoft MVP program. He created the concept of the Most Valuable Professional a.k.a. MVP. Today there are thousands of MVPs across multiple Microsoft product lines, but they owe their very existence to Sean O'Driscoll.

Fun Fact: One of my roles at Microsoft was in the Developer Platform Evangelist (DPE) team. Which is now the DX team under Guggs.

The Three Pillars of Evangelism

I also give Microsoft credit for realizing the value of the three types of evangelists: there's an evangelist that knows the coding aspects; there's also the technical evangelist that knows the IT aspect, and finally there's a solutions oriented evangelist that understands the business aspects. Often times these evangelists span all three pillars. Microsoft recognizes these evangelists with the MVP awards.

image

Do they miss a few people? Sure, but that’s the way things go when you have a vibrant ecosystem of experts with different areas of expertise to contribute.

Some of the terms have changed over time too. Today we hear of DevOps, BizOps, and we still hear about Big Data.

Buzzwords change, but the underlying skills
of evangelists never wavers.

It Takes a Village

Image result for salesforce mvpOther companies have gotten in on this too. Salesforce is one good example. They have built up a partner ecosystem with a collection of what they also call MVP's. I guess Sean O’Driscoll was really onto something with the naming. I haven't seen as much from the Salesforce model lately but I'm pretty sure they're still there and still growing.

Even my old company, K2, also had an active community. But, that went away when my role went away. What I think they realized, like every other company realizes, is that it does take time, money, and effort to build up the community and to build up the muscle around that effort.

Back to the Microsoft MVP effort. As I mentioned Christian Buckley is the penultimate evangelist. There are several others in the Microsoft MVP community that are also incredible representatives, including Marc D Anderson, Eric Shupps, Ruven Gotz, and the Uber King of demos Mark Rackley (I once saw him do 7 really solid demos in one hour).

WIT and STEM Evangelists

One thing I can also say about evangelism is it's not gender specific. There are quite a few Women in Technology that I have met over the years that are phenomenal with customers, incredible when it comes to the IT architecture side, and equally amazing in writing code that dazzles.

 [image%255B4%255D.png]

A few examples include Lauren Cooney, Betsy Weber, Naomi Moneypenny, Dena Marean, Erica Toelle, Sharon Healey, Sonya Koptyev, Michelle Caldwell, and Sue Hanley … to name a few. There are countless others that focus on various aspects of evangelism and they do it with such aplomb that is impossible to name them all here.

Evangelism is an equal
opportunity employer

Who can be an Evangelist?

If someone shows the aptitude … Let 'em give it a try. Evangelism is a calling.

What do you think about evangelism?

  • When was the first time you heard the term technical evangelist?
  • Who are your favorite technical and business evangelists?
  • Would you agree that the industry has been changed by the term evangelism?
  • What other industries have adopted the concept and term of an evangelist?

In the end Guy Kawasaki didn’t give me a job. He didn’t give me a career. He gave me a calling.

What’s your calling?

Drop your comments in the notes here. Inquiring evangelists want to know.

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Image Credits: Microsoft, Canva, Guy Kawasaki

clip_image001Jeff is an expert in the Enterprise Content Management industry. He brings over 20 years of Channel Sales, Partner Marketing and Alliance expertise to audiences around the world in speaking engagements and via his writing. He has worked for Microsoft, Kodak, and K2. He is currently the consulting with Microsoft and partners to drive Community Engagement and Alliances.

Tweet him
@jshuey or connect on LinkedIn, Facebook, or Google+ He is active in the Microsoft Partner Community and is the co-founder and President of the IAMCP Seattle chapter. He is also active with the Women in Technology and STEMWIT efforts.

He is a contributing author to
Entrepreneur, Elite Daily, Yahoo, US News and to the Personal Branding Blog

image

Saturday, May 7, 2016

Where would you store a Petabyte?

imageRuss Knows!

I had the pleasure of catching up with my longtime friend Russ Stalters recently.

Russ and I have worked on projects for longer than I can remember - spanning my Microsoft, FileNet, Kofax, Kodak, K2 and Gimmal days. 

He is a master at developing processes to create records management, document management, document capture, and archiving solutions. And most important ... building teams of people to manage these processes in a predictable and repeatable manner.

He is launching a new chapter in his life and shared with me some of the things he is working on. His most recent assignment that took up the past few years of his life was to store multiple petabytes of information for a large multi-national organization.

binding-contract-948442_1920I asked him ...

How would you store a Petabyte?

He said ... very carefully!

Then added a few more points that I took some liberties turning them into questions here:

  • What if you had to do it and always make those documents discoverable?
  • What if the same documents had to be available worldwide?
  • What if those documents were generated in multiple formats - paper & electronic and across disparate systems around the globe?

That's what Russ did!

In his role for a large multinational conglomerate Russ had to make sure that documents and other information were captured, stored, and destroyed when the timeframe was necessary.

This isn't the first time Russ has worked on projects like this. He's worked for software companies and for customers both large and small to ensure that document capture, document and systems workflow, document management & records management and archival efforts work seamlessly and flawlessly.

That's what Russ did!

Recently Russ was in Seattle for some meetings with another multinational conglomerate (Hint: Based in Redmond) and I had the pleasure of being able to catch up with him at our local coffee establishment.

It was great to catch up with them and hear about some of the new projects he is just starting to pick up as he transitions out of his old role and back into his very comfortable and traditional consulting role.

He let me know he'll be back to consulting again with large multinational global we distributed conglomerates and also with smaller companies that are moving to the cloud and trying to ensure that all their documents and content are tracked and manage both securely, properly, and professionally.

In the cloud it is critical to track and manage content securely, properly, and within compliance guidelines

Just like with all documents and information within a business everything needs a governance plan and must be managed and made available in a secure, predictable and reliable format.

Data ROT happens!

imageOne factor a lot of companies don't often take into consideration is the fact that documents and data have a shelf life. 

Documents, Data and Devices have a Shelf Life

The idea of data rot or bit rot actually happens. The ability to securely and successfully protect paper, microfilm and microfiche has been around for many many years. The ability to protect data both on-site and in secure locations around the world has also been around for many years. There is a need to ensure that both of these data streams are secured and synced.

Russ does that too!

Russ is also working on a few technical papers and a new book about his 20+ years in the industry. I look forward to reading it and maybe even being a proofreader for it. I think you'll want to pick it up too.

If you need help determining where and how to store a Petabyte ...  Russ Knows!

If you want to get in touch with Russ there are three options to start - hisLinkedIn profile, his website or send him email directly. Take a few minutes to reach out and he'll be happy to share what he's doing. And, if you have data needs large or small Russ may be able to help you.

As always ...
Russ it was great to catch up!

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This is part of my on-going series of posts where I try to have a little fun and share a little of my insights on People, Process and Technology. Sometimes I get the chance to sing the praises of really smart people too. 

This was cross posted to LinkedIn here … if you want to be notified when I post to LinkedIn click on this link and click "Follow" the top of page. Or, just Connect with me on LinkedIn and you’ll also be notified.

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Image Credits: Getting Information Done, CBS Sunday Morning

clip_image001Jeff is an expert in the Enterprise Content Management industry. He brings over 20 years of Channel Sales, Partner Marketing and Alliance expertise to audiences around the world in speaking engagements and via his writing. He has worked for Microsoft, Kodak, and K2. He is currently the consulting with Microsoft and partners to drive Community Engagement and Alliances.

Tweet him
@jshuey or connect on LinkedIn, Facebook, or Google+ He is active in the Microsoft Partner Community and is the co-founder and President of the IAMCP Seattle chapter. He is also active with the Women in Technology and STEMWIT efforts.

He is a contributing author to
Entrepreneur, Elite Daily, Yahoo, US News and to the Personal Branding Blog

image

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

76 Trombones in the Big Parade

LI - Pic of WPC and TOR T-76 (Trombones)Will you be there?

Will you make it to the Big Show?

Will you make it to The Big Parade?

The Big Parade starts in 76 days.
WPC 16 is almost here. 

T-76 

We are at 76 Days before the worlds largest Partner to Partner Conference. Make sure you are prepared to do at least the following four things:

  1. Register - Start Here!
  2. Begin your Pre-Event Planning
  3. Build out your message and elevator pitch
  4. Follow Up! This is the #1 thing you can do to differentiate yourself.

15,000+

There are expected to be more than 15,000 partners at the WPC 16. Some you may already be partnering with. Others you SHOULD be partnering with. Make it EASY for them to identify you and you them.

P2P

Also, Microsoft has published some of the key elements of the WPC event. 

Dont Miss .... The Road to WPC

As noted here before ... there is a road trip in the works with Kevin McMillen from Ryantech. Follow along and get involved here. Let us know if you are on the route. If you are there may be a special surprise for you. Details are here on this post 

image

You can follow along here: http://www.theroadtowpc16.com/
Subscribe to the updates to stay abreast of the plans.

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Will You Be There for the Big Parade?

I hope so.

If yes …

Meet me in Toronto for the largest
Partner-to-Partner Conference in the world.
 

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You may also want to check these out for more details - both have a short video:

Image Credits: Microsoft, Ryantech

clip_image001Jeff is an expert in the Enterprise Content Management industry. He brings over 20 years of Channel Sales, Partner Marketing and Alliance expertise to audiences around the world in speaking engagements and via his writing. He has worked for Microsoft, Kodak, and K2. He is currently the consulting with Microsoft and partners to drive Community Engagement and Alliances.

Tweet him
@jshuey or connect on LinkedIn, Facebook, or Google+ He is active in the Microsoft Partner Community and is the co-founder and President of the IAMCP Seattle chapter. He is also active with the Women in Technology and STEMWIT efforts.

He is a contributing author to
Entrepreneur, Elite Daily, Yahoo, US News and to the Personal Branding Blog

image

Saturday, April 16, 2016

Is 150 years too much time?

This month two businesses turned 150 years old and one innovator would have turned 153.

  • Did they do it with one product?
  • Did they do it with one specific feature?
  • Did they do it with one call to action?

One of them did it with effectively the same product for the entire time. The other two continued to modify, adapt (more on that in a minute ), and to really think about what customers wanted. And, the third did it with pure style and attention to detail.

imageAll of them did it with ONE THING.

That one thing morphed over time.

That one thing took work to understand and appreciate.

That one thing took time to appreciate and ingratiate itself into the consumer psyche.

Is 150 years enough to consider yourself a viable long-term company?

I think the obvious answer is yes.

Can you imagine your business surviving to be 150 years old?

In the technology space where I spend the majority of my time IBM has broken the hundred year mark and Microsoft just passed the 40 year mark. Many others in tech space are nowhere near 20, let alone 50 or 150.

Can you imagine Facebook at 150?

How about Snapchat or Twitter?

Is Built to Last still a thing?

Jim Collins wrote the seminal book "Built to Last" a few years ago. No, not 150 years ago. In it he described businesses that were, surprise ... Built to Last" and shared examples of their long term study. This is not a diatribe on Built to Last.

Rather it's a reflection of three companies that have found the One Thing that allowed then to persevere and succeed. Two of them for 150 years and one for 110 years. My suspicion is that these companies will continue to plug along. General Mills did almost $18 billion in revenue last year. However, I wonder if some of the "upstart" companies that are doing well today can make it to 50 years. Or even if they want to.

The three companies I'm looking at today came from a few segments on the CBS Sunday show and one was from a commercial I happen to see.

  • imageGeneral Mills - From flour to organic mac-n-cheese. And, the invention of the Nerf products too. The Big G is a great example of a company that has found growth in commodity products by continuous innovation and adaptation. They never seem to rest of their laurels.

    This video from CBS Sunday about their 150 Years in business explains where they started, how they've grown and where they are going.

    Ken Powell, chairman and CEO of General Mills, said it best:

    "By adapting" That is how the company has survived this long.
  • 20160415_015703373_iOSJack Daniels - The venerable maker of whiskey has made effectively the same product for 150 years.

    Over time, and especially in the past few years, there has been more adaptation and innovation to attract, capture and secure new markets. Both in the US and in overseas markets where the brand practically sells itself.
  • imageRolls-Royce - Not quite 150 years for the company, but 153 years ago motorcar legend Henry Royce was born near Peterborough, England.

    He developed THE STANDARD for automotive luxury. Their brand and their reputation for building automobiles with impeccable attention to detail remains the gold standard ... even 110 years after the famous brand built their first automobile. Here is an interesting Almanac view from CBS Sunday

Full Disclosure: I saw these two video clips on the same day a few weeks ago and have been noodling around this idea for the desire of any company to make it to 150 years.

I'm not convinced any of the relatively young companies of today can make it. Or even want to make it to 150 years.

While I was noodling this idea I saw a commercial that showed Jack Daniel's is also 150 years old. Which caught my eye and intrigued me.

Is 150 Years Too Long?

I used each of the companies above as an example. Which leads to a few questions about longevity and whether there is a market force that would prevent a company today from making it to the advanced age of 50, 100 or 150 years.

  • Can today's "modern" companies survive to be 50, 100, or even older than 150 year old enterprises?
  • Do the economics work against them?
  • Do market forces reward longevity?

Time will tell ... literally.

The One Thing

Adapt

The CEO of General Mills said it very eloquently and aptly. He said the way they have survived and grown for so long is by constantly seeking to adapt.

Which leads me to a few questions for you to consider. As I mentioned above I'm not sure any of the current spate of companies that are doing quite well today have any desire or intention ... let alone a plan ... to grow to be ever 50 years old. Let alone 100 or 150 years old.

What do you think?

  • How will your company adapt for the future?
    • Whether you own the company or "just" work there.
  • How will the companies that you trust and respect (and maybe even love) today adapt for the future?

Discuss. Drop your thoughts here in the comments. Or reach out to me via social networking or email.

Image Credits: CBS Sunday

clip_image001Jeff is an expert in the Enterprise Content Management industry. He brings over 20 years of Channel Sales, Partner Marketing and Alliance expertise to audiences around the world in speaking engagements and via his writing. He has worked for Microsoft, Kodak, and K2. He is currently the consulting with Microsoft and partners to drive Community Engagement and Alliances.

Tweet him
@jshuey or connect on LinkedIn, Facebook, or Google+ He is active in the Microsoft Partner Community and is the co-founder and President of the IAMCP Seattle chapter. He is also active with the Women in Technology and STEMWIT efforts.

He is a contributing author to
Entrepreneur, Elite Daily, Yahoo, US News and to the Personal Branding Blog

image

Thursday, April 14, 2016

88 Keys and 88 Days --- The Countdown to WPC

image88 Keys on a Piano and 88 Days to the Microsoft Worldwide Partner Conference.

Coincidence? I think not.

The WPC is Almost Here

I have 6 things to cover in todays Notes from the Trails video. The points are also covered in the text below. There are links to each point and I’m always open to hearing from you. Please feel free to reach out directly or to comment here.

20160414_025159000_iOS from Jeff Shuey on Vimeo.

1 and 2 are closely aligned – Keeping up with the Microsoft Leaders

Make sure you are following along with Microsoft’s Channel Chief Phil Sorgen. He is posting great information about what partners can do and expect at the WPC. He also posts information about other aspects of the Microsoft business – including partner activities, IAMCP efforts and some of the products and technologies that Microsoft is developing.

image

Also, follow along with Gavriella Schuster, Microsoft’s GM of the WW Partner Group. She is posting information about how partners can get the most from Microsoft. She has a great team and she stays engaged in the partner community. She also shares information about how to connect across generations, how to optimize your sales and marketing teams, and how to work with with multiple technologies and multiple partners. She has also been a great advocate for IAMCP and WIT motions.

image

3 and 4 are also closely aligned – Keeping up with Partner Leaders

  • IAMCP – Get involved. Connect, Learn and Grow your business. With 80 chapters around the world you should connect with your local International Association of Microsoft Channel Partners (IAMCP) Chapter. Get Started here.
  • imageWIT – Most of the IAMCP chapters are also aligned with a local Women in Technology (WIT). Together we are working hard to encourage women of all ages to get involved with technology – which often spans STEM and STEAM efforts.

5 is very Seattle specific – Visit the IAMCP Seattle Chapter

  • imageApril 21 – Our first meeting at the new Microsoft PacWest Sales Office at Lincoln Square. Details are here. Join us!
  • May 18 – Cloud Readiness Bootcamp
  • May 19 – P2P Workshop
  • Seattle IAMCP WIT Chapter Info – Sign up for the newsletter here.

6 is all about the FunBus --- a portmanteau of Fun and Business.

imageKevin McMillen, Founder of Ryantech is making the cross-county FunBus trip from Phoenix to Toronto in a motorhome.

The map of the trip is here and you can sign up to be updated here.

imageRumor has it that there might be an upright piano in the motorhome. Where Ryan and others can regale partners and friends along the way with their skills at tickling the ivory.

You’ll have to folllow along with the FunBus ride by adding your name to the list here.

 

See you in 88 Days!

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If you haven’t registered for The WPC yet …. Click on the image below to go to the registration site and take advantage of the discounts.See you in Toronto.

image

Image Credits: Microsoft, Ryantech

clip_image001Jeff is an expert in the Enterprise Content Management industry. He brings over 20 years of Channel Sales, Partner Marketing and Alliance expertise to audiences around the world in speaking engagements and via his writing. He has worked for Microsoft, Kodak, and K2. He is currently the consulting with Microsoft and partners to drive Community Engagement and Alliances.

Tweet him
@jshuey or connect on LinkedIn, Facebook, or Google+ He is active in the Microsoft Partner Community and is the co-founder and President of the IAMCP Seattle chapter. He is also active with the Women in Technology and STEMWIT efforts.

He is a contributing author to
Entrepreneur, Elite Daily, Yahoo, US News and to the Personal Branding Blog

image